Scuba Diving Java

The capitol island of Indonesia, Java, include diving around the famous Krakatoa volcano, exploring a national marine park and exploring wrecks from WW 2.

 

java

 

Java is dominated by an active volcanic mountain range stretching along its length. To the north is the capital city of Jakarta. Mt Bromo, to the east, is an active volcano with some stunning scenery. In addition to diving, you can explore temples, museums and even take a dip at Taman Sari water castle, formerly occupied by one of the royal families.

Scuba Diving Java is more popular in the North side of the Island. Known for its volcano formations, divers find volcanic tunnels and swim throughs throughout the region. The lesser-known side of Java offers the unique diving in waters west of the island. Here three main islands mark the remains of the mighty Krakatau. It is an under seascape of volcanic rock, so fissured and slabbed that some look like ancient ruins. The presence of hard coral and unexpectedly giant gorgonian draws jacks, fusiliers, Moorish idols, sharks and turtles.

Ujung Kulon National Park, A World Heritage Site located in the extreme south-western tip of Java on the Sunda shelf, includes the Ujung Kulon peninsula and several offshore islands and encompasses the natural reserve of Krakatoa. This is another prime dive base. Rocks like underwater mountains rise to pierce the surface of the sea. These are patrolled by barracuda, bump head parrotfish and turtles. For a dive with a difference, fin with schools of fish in tunnels leading to inland caves.

HIGHLIGHT DIVE AREAS

Pulau Seribu – the Thousand Island group comprising loads of tiny islands scattered across the Java Sea to the North of Jakarta.

Karimunjawa – a 27 island archipelago in the Java sea and around 85km from the mainland.

Krakatoa – a volcano near the island of Rakata in the Sunda Strait. It has erupted repeatedly, massively and with disastrous consequences throughout history.  Consequently, the diving is mostly for divers who enjoy caverns, and swimthroughs created by the lava rocks.

Ujung Kulon – Tanjung Layar lighthouse on the tip of Ujung Kulon National Park is the landmark for a rocky dive location off the west point of the peninsula. The visibility can be up to 20 meters, coral is scarce, but the underwater valley is home to large Barracuda.

HIGHLIGHT DIVE SITES

Krakatau – Three main islands mark the remains of the mighty Krakatau. It is an underseascape of volcanic rock, so fissured and slabbed that some look like ancient ruins. The presence of hard coral and unexpectedly giant gorgonian draws jacks, fusiliers, Moorish idols, sharks and turtles.

HMAS Perth and USS Huston –  Two very well preserved WW2 battleships that lay about 3 miles apart.  They lay at a depth of 115 feet (35m) and are popular with technical divers.  Penetration of both wrecks is possible.

Ujung Kulon National Park –  a peninsula of Java, is another prime dive base. Rocks like underwater mountains rise to pierce the surface of the sea. These are patrolled by barracuda, bumphead parrotfish and turtles. For a dive with a difference, fin with schools of fish in tunnels leading to inland caves.

Pulau Seribu –  literally the Thousand islands, are a popular divers’ haunt, thanks to its easy access and the generous choice of dive sites among its islands. Divers are spoiled for services in resorts ranging from the plush to the basic and organized dive trips with local clubs and operators. Dives here feature excellent soft corals and fish life, and a number of wrecks.

Karimunjawa –  is a 27 island archipelago off the north coast of Java, a three hour ferry ride from the mainland. The area is divided into seperate conservation zones to help preserve the environment. Fringing reefs are healthy with clear water, colourful corals and good fish life.

Indonur –  a large Dutch steamship that hit a reef in 1963 when her captain mistook a fire on a beach for the lights of Semarang. Large groupers can be seen on the wreck as well as moray eels, lionfish, scorpionfish and octopus.

DIVE INFORMATION

DIVE SEASON: Year-round.

VISIBILITY: Average visibility is 10m/33ft to 45m/148ft.

WATER TEMPERATURE: 27°C/79°F (July to Dec), 29°C/84°F (Jan/Feb)

WEATHER:  High humidity can be expected during the Wet Season between the months of October – April. The Dry Season between the months of May – September has the lowest humidity.

The Wet Season brings daily rain and quiet overcast days with the most rain recorded between December – February. Occasionally rainfall can also be expected during the dry season but usually at night or very early morning. June – August there is usually a very refreshing cool breeze all day long. The central mountain area is typically cooler than the lower coastal areas mainly especially at night.

SKILL LEVEL: Dives for all diver skill levels are readily available.

MARINE LIFE:  Beautiful volcanic underwater structure,  ship wrecks, barracuda, bumphead parrotfish,  turtles, fusiliers, Moorish idols and sharks

GENERAL INFORMATION

CLIMATE: The rainy season on Java lasts from November – March with most of the rain falling in the late afternoon. In the West and South-West you can expect the occasional spot of rain in the dry season as well. On Sumatra the monsoons can very heavy making roads inaccessible, whereas in eastern Java there’s hardly any rain in dry season. Temperatures average 22-29 degrees all year round. Best time to travel to Sumatra and/or Java is April – October.

LANGUAGE: Bahasa Indonesia is the national and official language in the entire country.

ELECTRICITY: Electric power supply is 220 volts in all regions. So be careful with your 110-volt electronic equipment. The sockets will only fit with with two pins rounded-tip plugs (technically known as Type C, E, and F) or use adaptors.

CURRENCY & CREDIT CARDS: The Indonesia Rupiah (Rp) is also called IDR. IDR and US$ are the most acceptable currencies. Most tourism resorts have money changer facilities. When you are traveling to remote areas it is advisable to exchange your money and clear your check. Credit cards are only acceptable in big hotels, restaurants, shops and traveling agencies.

GRATUITIES: Most hotels add a 10% service charge to the bill on top of the 10% tax. In restaurants where service charge is not added, a tip of 5 to 10% on the bill will be appropriate depending on the service and type of establishment.

PHONE & INTERNET SERVICE: Country code +62. Most hotels and many restaurants in large cities provide internet connections or free WiFi.

VISA & PASSPORT REQUIREMENTS:  All travelers to Indonesia must be in possession of a passport that is valid for at least six months from the date of arrival, and have proof (tickets) of onward or return passage. Visa upon arrival is $35 Payable by USD cash only. Please check with your country if you are eligible for visa upon arrival. Visa-on-Arrival are valid for 30 days and are extendable with another 30 days to be applied at Immigration offices in Indonesia.

CUSTOMS:   Maximum items allowed by customs when you visit Indonesia, 1 liter of alcoholic beverages, 200 cigarettes OR 50 cigars OR 100 grams of tobacco, Reasonable amount of perfume per adult, meaning if you arrive drenched in perfume the customs probably will not mind you carrying loads of bottles, Cameras, video cameras, portable radios, cassette recorders, binoculars and sport equipments are admitted provided they are taken out on departure. They must be declared to Customs.

DEPARTURE TAX: An airport tax of IDR150,000 – IDR200,000 is levied by airports on departing passengers on international flights and IDR30,000-IDR75,000 for those on domestic routes. Airport tax must be paid in Rupiah cash.

GETTING THERE: Most all major cities are connected by direct international flights and many carriers fly passengers to Indonesia’s towns and remote locations.

International Airport:

Java: 

Bandung: Husein Sastranegara International Airport (BDO)

Jakarta:  Soekarno–Hatta International Airport (CGK)

Solo City: Adisumarmo International Airport (SOC)

Yogyakarta: Adisucipto International Airport (JOG)

USEFUL INFORMATION

Indonesia Tourism Information

Map

 

More Information on INDONESIA

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