Scuba Diving Cabo San Lucas

Where the Sea of Cortez meets the Pacific Ocean!

 

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Welcome to Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo, Los Cabos, a world-class travel destination at the southernmost tip of the Baja Peninsula. Los Cabos is made up of two cities, cosmopolitan Cabo San Lucas, where the well known rock formation know as “El Arco”, where the Sea of Cortez meets the Pacific Ocean.

HIGHLIGHT DIVE SITES

Cabo San Lucas Marine Park: The bay of Cabo San Lucas encompasses several unique dive sites. These dive sites were protected in 1973 by the President of Mexico when he declared them the second underwater national marine park after Cozumel. Inside the park it is forbidden to fish, spearfish or collect anything. All of the dive sites are within a quick 10 minute boat ride from Cabo San Lucas’ Marina and the conditions inside the bay are usually calm with no or little currents and a calm surface.

Cabo San Lucas Marine Park: The bay of Cabo San Lucas encompasses several unique dive sites. These dive sites were protected in 1973 by the President of Mexico when he declared them the second underwater national marine park after Cozumel. Inside the park it is forbidden to fish, spearfish or collect anything. All of the dive sites are within a quick 10 minute boat ride from Cabo San Lucas’ Marina and the conditions inside the bay are usually calm with no or little currents and a calm surface.

Pelican Rock: The reef starts at 15 ft. and gradually slopes to 70 feet before it drops off a deep wall down to 500 feet. One of the famous “Sandfalls” is located at the top of the submarine canyon in about 90 feet of water. This is a calm protected site teeming with a wide variety of tropical fish and invertebrates. You may see large schools of snappers, sea bass, scorpion fish, porcupine and puffer fish. Moray eels and devil rays along with electric and cortez rays and many more call this site home.

Land’s End or The Point: This dive site is unique because you dive in both the Sea of Cortes and the Pacific Ocean at the same time. Large schools of baracudas, tunas and baitfish make this an unforgetable dive. The flat rock inside the cove is home to a small colony of California sea lions which dive and play with the divers. A shipwrech is found Southeast of the rock at only 50 feet. Large schools of cow-nose rays and devil rays (small mantas) can be seen during the summer months.

Neptunes Finger: This dive sites consists of two coral reefs, a beautifull vertical wall and the biggest sandfall of the Cabo San Lucas Marine park. The top of the reef is only 15 feet deep and the vertical wall drops down to more than 500 feet. Turtles, groupers, machetes, goatfish and a lot of other tropical fish have made this reef their home. Neptunes Finger is also a good place to see big fish like manta rays, schooling devil rays, yellowtails and amber jacks. Even Mola Molas (sunfish) have been seen here.

Middle Wall: The middle wall is a vertical drop-off from 75 – 500+ feet. The average depth for this dive is 100 feet. Diving next to the wall without seeing the bottom gives you a sensational feeling of freedom. The rocky cliff face continues to the west until it connects with the sandfalls at Pelican Rock. Enormous groupers and large schools of pigmy mantas as well as sharks and even whale sharks can be seen here.

North Wall:  The North Wall is a great dive for beginners as well as for more experienced divers. The rock-covered slope goes from 15 to 70 feet and makes a great home for moray eels, puffer and porcupine fish. Flute fish, scorpionfish, spiny and slipper lobsters also call this place home and during the summer months even seahorses can be seen.

Anegada: On the edge of the Submarine Canyon that forms San Lucas Bay. Beautiful wall dive to small sandfall at around 90′. Large congregations of big and small tropicals. Slopes covered with gorgonians and graceful sea fans. Not uncommon to spot rays and large pelagics swimming out of nearby deeper water. Also an excellent night dive, The Bay of San Lucas is a National Marine Sanctuary so we take only pictures and leave only bubbles.

La Larga: 60′ to 120′ Canyons. Rocky outcrops give way to steep vertical granite walls and rocky ledges at 100′. Thick with gorgonians and sea fans. Octopus, abundant tropicals, schools of barracuda and other pelagics. Largest of the two famous sandfalls begins here at 100′.

LOS CABOS: Along the 18 mile tourist corridor between Cabo San Lucas and San Jose Del Cabo there are 5 great dive sites. The topography of this sites are very different from the ones at the Cabo San Lucas Marine Park. The boat ride to the sites takes anywhere between 10 and 30 minutes from the Cabo San Lucas Marina. Schools of dolphins and jumping manta rays are often seen on the way to the dive sites.

 

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Whales Head: This shallow dive site starts in only 5 feet and ends in a sandy bottom at 50 feet. Thecoral growth is superb and unmatched in this region. This spot is also known to be home to sea turtles, octopus, moray eels and nurse sharks. Large schools of snappers are sometimes seen on the sandy bottom next to the reef.

Tres Amigos: 20 minutes away by boat and 1/2 a mile off-shore there is a long but thin reef sloping down from 60 to 100 feet. The most interesting area is a large rock with its top at 70 feet where large schools of jack circle the divers . Other inhabitants are lobsters, angelfish, groupers and cortez rays. This dive is for experienced divers only because of the occasional currents and free descent to 100 feet.

Chileno Bay: This is a beautiful, protected reef that starts at 100 yards off the shore of Chileno Beach and extends out into the bay for about a half of a mile. The reef is covered with sea fans and sometimes we get to see mantas, large sea bass, sea turtles and nurse sharks. Invertebrates like Starfish, Flower Urchins and Hydroids are also common. It is also a very appealing site to the beginning diver or snorkeler. Here you will experience very shallow and calm waters. Depth: 5 – 60 ft.

Santa Maria: This site starts on the southern side of the protected Santa Maria bay in only 10 feet and gruadually drops down to 45 feet. The shallow reef is teeming with marine life like Surgeon and angelfish, porcupinefish, pufferfish, groupers and hogfish. Also Snappers, moorish idols, nudibranches, flatworms and several species of rays have made this site their home. In general there is no current but sometimes divers feel the surge from the waves.

The Blow Hole: This reef got its name from a small blowhole in the cliffs nearby. Massive boulders and deep rock-cuts form the the reef of this spectacular and exciting dive. Manta rays, turtles, schools of jacks and groupers are common inhabitants here. There is also a small wall on the northern side which drops from 50 to 100+ feet. This dive is suitable for beginners and professionals and is a must for underwater photographers and videographers.

GORDO BANKS: An amazing experience for advanced divers. Eight miles off the coast of San Jose Del Cabo, the top of this seamount lies under 110′ – 130′ of water. Due to the depth and currents this dive is only for the highly experienced diver.. Plenty of action in the first few feet of the water column, schools of jacks, mackerels, tunas and snapper, large groupers, sometimes devil rays, eagle rays, cow-nose rays and mobula rays. With a bit of luck you may also see scalloped hammerhead sharks. The top of this sea-mount is covered in black coral.

DIVE INFORMATION

DIVING SEASON: Year-round. The best time is late June to early November. The absolute best months are September and October, when the seas are flat, visibility peaks at 60 feet or more.

In winter, surface water temperatures drop to 65 to 70F. Seas can kick up to two to three feet, and vis drops to an average of 30 to 50 feet due to plankton blooms. On the plus side, gray whales and occasionally blue whales move into the sea in winter to feed and mate, increasing your chances of an encounter.

VISIBILITY:  Summer time visibility peaks at 60 feet (18m) or more.  During the winter months the vis drops to an average of 30 to 50 feet (9-15m) due to plankton blooms.

WATER TEMPERATURE:  During the summer, surface temperatures hit a toasty 85F. It’s still cold enough below the thermocline that most divers opt for full 3mm wetsuits. In winter, surface water temperatures drop to 65 to 70F, so you’ll need a 5mm or 6mm full wetsuit with hood and gloves.

WEATHER: The average year-round temperature is 78F. During the high tourist season, October to April, the temperature is typically 80F during the day and cools to the 60’s at night. In the low season, May to September, the temperature will go up to 100+F during the day and stay in the upper 70’s and low 80’s in the evening. The average year-round water temperature in the Sea of Cortez is 72F. During the summer months the water temperature can reach the mid 80’s. The climate is arid with over 300 days of sunshine, with some reports of over 350 days. Average annual rainfall is 10 inches (25.4cm), most with occurring during the months of September and October.

The Pacific Ocean side of Los Cabos is generally 10º F. cooler than the Sea of Cortés.

 

More information on Sea of Cortez

More information on Mexico

 

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