Lost Egyptian City Artifacts Unearthed After 1,200 Years Under Sea

0

What Scientists Just Found Deep In The Ocean Is Seriously Unbelievable. I’m Still In Shock!

It is a city shrouded in myth, swallowed by the Mediterranean Sea and buried in sand and mud for more than 1,200 years. But now archeologists are unearthing the mysteries of Heracleion, uncovering amazingly well-preserved artifacts that tell the story of a vibrant classical-era port.

Heracleion Photos: Lost Egyptian City Artifacts Unearthed After 1,200 Years Under Sea
Heracleion Photos: Lost Egyptian City Artifacts Unearthed After 1,200 Years Under Sea

Known as Heracleion to the ancient Greeks and Thonis to the ancient Eygptians, the city was rediscovered in 2000 by French underwater archaeologist Dr. Franck Goddio and a team from the European Institute for Underwater Acheology (IEASM) after a four-year geophysical survey. The ruins of the lost city were found 30 feet under the surface of the Mediterranean Sea in Aboukir Bay, near Alexandria.

The city dates back to the 6th century B.C. and holds some of the most beautiful artifacts you could imagine. Things like grand statues of gods and goddesses standing well over 15 feet tall and carved out of red granite, treasures of gold and rare stones, elaborate temples and enormous tablets. This find is enormous in the historical preservation community and has been commissioned by museums around the world.

Franck Goddio examining the enormous hand carved statue of a pharaoh. This statue stands roughly 16 feet tall and was found near a large temple under the sea.
Franck Goddio examining the enormous hand carved statue of a pharaoh. This statue stands roughly 16 feet tall and was found near a large temple under the sea.
Here is the head of a statue carved out of red granite depicting the god Hapi. Hapi is known as the god of the flooding of the Nile. Hapi is a symbol of abundance and fertility and has never been discovered at such a large-scale before.
Here is the head of a statue carved out of red granite depicting the god Hapi. Hapi is known as the god of the flooding of the Nile. Hapi is a symbol of abundance and fertility and has never been discovered at such a large-scale before.

So far, 64 ancient shipwrecks and more than 700 anchors have been unearthed from the mud of the bay, the news outlet notes. Other findings include gold coins, weights from Athens (which have never before been found at an Egyptian site) and giant tablets inscribed in ancient Greek and ancient Egyptian. Researchers think that these artifacts point to the city’s prominence as a bustling trade hub.

Researchers have also uncovered a variety of religious artifacts in the sunken city, including 16-foot stone sculptures thought to have adorned the city’s central temple and limestone sarcophagi that are believed to have contained mummified animals.

Franck Goddio showing off the size of this inscribed stele. This was ordered to be built by Nectanebo I sometime between 378 and 362 B.C.
Franck Goddio showing off the size of this inscribed stele. This was ordered to be built by Nectanebo I sometime between 378 and 362 B.C.
A bronze oil lamp in excellent condition. This dates back to the 2nd century B.C.
A bronze oil lamp in excellent condition. This dates back to the 2nd century B.C.

Experts have marveled at the variety of artifacts found and have been equally impressed by how well preserved they are.

“The archaeological evidence is simply overwhelming,” Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe, a University of Oxford archeologist taking part in the excavation, said in a press release obtained by The Huffington Post. “By lying untouched and protected by sand on the sea floor for centuries they are brilliantly preserved.”

A panel of experts presented their findings at an Oxford University conference on the Thonis-Heracleion excavation earlier this year.

But despite all the excitement over the excavation, one mystery about Thonis-Heracleion remains largely unsolved: Why exactly did it sink? Goddio’s team suggests the weight of large buildings on the region’s water-logged clay and sand soil may have caused the city to sink in the wake of an earthquake.

Here the divers carefully inspect a stone full of gold fragments that date back to the 6th century B.C. I’m amazed that these are still in tact.
Here the divers carefully inspect a stone full of gold fragments that date back to the 6th century B.C. I’m amazed that these are still in tact.
This gold plaque was found in the southern sector of the city. The text is written in Greek and acts as a signature for foundation deposits in the name of the king responsible for building this area. King Ptolemy III (246-222 B.C.)
This gold plaque was found in the southern sector of the city. The text is written in Greek and acts as a signature for foundation deposits in the name of the king responsible for building this area. King Ptolemy III (246-222 B.C.)
Here is a beautiful artifact, a Graeco-Egyptian statue of a queen carved out of dark stone.
Here is a beautiful artifact, a Graeco-Egyptian statue of a queen carved out of dark stone.
Here the pharaoh, the queen and the god Hapi are laid on the barge next to a temple stele. The stele dates back to the 2nd century B.C.. It was found broken into 17 pieces however all were found and placed back together.
Here the pharaoh, the queen and the god Hapi are laid on the barge next to a temple stele. The stele dates back to the 2nd century B.C.. It was found broken into 17 pieces however all were found and placed back together.

This is an absolutely epic underwater find that has researchers scrambling to this part of the globe to learn about this incredibly beautiful Egyptian city. The fact that this city found underwater has been left untouched underwater for so many years is an amazing factor on its own let alone being a find as big as it truly is. These statues and artifacts are massive and nearly perfectly preserved. The attention to detail in these pieces is truly beautiful and I’m happy to see it being preserved with great care.

Source: Huffingtonpost.com, thedailyberries.com

All content provided on the “Scuba Diving Resource”  website is for informational purposes only. Any comments, opinions that may be found here at Scuba Diving Resource are the express opinions and or the property of their individual authors.
Scuba Diving Resource makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. Please note that regulations and information can change at any time.

November 10, 2017 |

Leave a Reply

Powered By DesignThisWebsite.com
Skip to toolbar